Introducing the Chronicles of Yugoha

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Surprise! It has been nearly exactly a year since I released the last episode of Yu-Gi-Oh! Millennium, and ever since then I’ve been planning and debating with myself about a new series known as Chronicles of Yugoha. The idea for the series first came to my head when I was still writing the second to last season of Yu-Gi-Oh! Millennium. It would allow me to write something even once I completed Millennium. However, I then started Cosmic Quest, and decided that writing that was more important than starting a new series. Ever since then I have debated back and forth with myself on whether or not to write this series. There have been times, such as around the Yu-Gi-Oh! 20th anniversary last September where I got really close to deciding I had to do it. But I would always back down because I felt I was too busy to take on two stories. In all honesty, I probably am too busy to write two stories, so I can’t promise episodes for The Chronicles of Yugoha will come out all that often, but I figured something was better than nothing. What put me over the edge in the end was seeing the movie Dark Side of Dimensions. That movie was absolutely great, and it made me realize that if I didn’t write Chronicles of Yugoha now, that I never would. So here I am.

The concept of the series is that Yu-Gi-Oh! Millennium left a whole lot of history behind in its lore, and the only way to truly explore that lore is through its own story. The Chronicles of Yugoha is what I like to call anachronistic, meaning in this case that it has no specific order. Every chapter will be its own self-contained story, and could take place before, after, or even during the time frame of the previous chapter. Of course, just because the name is Yugoha, doesn’t mean it will focus entirely on the Yugohan Empire. It will also explore concepts such as Chaos and Order, other civilizations such as the Tyrian Empire or the Precursors, and maybe even have some episodes that take place during the other Yu-Gi-Oh! series. What this series really is, is a grand celebration of the entire universe’s history, with a special focus on Yugoha, and the way it shaped it.

You can read the story here.

Also, keep your eyes out for updates and upgrades I have planned for this website. I hope to bring it up a bit in quality.

Episodes 137-140 Review

Wow…this is really it. Even several days later, I’m still having trouble excepting it.

Anyways, it should be obvious to most that, just as most of the structure of this series was based upon that of the original series, so too was the finale arc. In the original series, the finale of the season took place when Atem battled and defeated Zorc, and then the finale of the series was Yugi’s ceremonial duel with Atem. Similarly, the battle with Ottiuk was meant to be treated as the season finale, and then the extra duel, Yu-Gi-Oh vs. Seto, was meant to be the series finale. As a child, I always remembered thinking that Kaiba got treated a little unfairly in the final season of the show. Ge barely did anything important at all. When he suggested that it should be him who faces Atem in the ceremonial duel, I actually agreed with him. He was Atem’s greatest rival, and it would tie up the series nicely, as the first episode was Yugi/Atem dueling with Kaiba (That being said, I do realize why it had to be Yugi, but still…). When I started thinking of my plot, I realized that not only could I put things right, but it would work out perfectly for the story if I did. This also, at least in my mind, helped make up for the fact that the incarnations of Prince Seto had little to do during the final duel with Ottiuk. This helped remind the reader that they’re important too.

The first episode was designed to be Yuni’s finale, as it was his final appearance in the series. It was all about tying up loose ends. The whole thing with his grandpa is actually something I’ve had planned since the beginning. I’ve always portrayed him as a carefree man that will let Yuni do anything he wants and be happy, as long as he has his recliner chair and a holovision. On the surface, this was an excuse for why Yuni could go off on a moment’s notice to save the world without his grandpa caring, but I figured that it would be more interesting in the end if there actually was a reason for this. As for Ma’at, it has been my intention all along to have him end up as the Lord of Chaos. His entire character arc had been leading up to that one discussion the two of them had.

On to the duel itself. There was a purposeful duality to this duel. Yu-Gi-Oh was using a deck based on Evolution Summoning, the newest way to summon a monster, while Seto was using a Tribute Summon deck, the most classic way (save straight up Normal Summoning) to summon a monster. Yu-Gi-Oh’s deck also served another purpose. It allowed me to showcase my original intentions for Evolution Monsters. My original concept was that Evolution was fairly versatile, and that the Evolution Base could vary, and the effect and/or power of the Evolution Monster would vary depending on the Evolution Base used. In order to best write duels though, I ended up focusing more on Evolution Monsters with set Evolution Base requirements. The Stellamancer deck was a way to better showcase my original idea.

I have always seen Yu-Gi-Oh! Millennium as being a potential grand finale for the Yu-Gi-Oh franchise as a whole. Because of that, I knew it had to end with a bang. The previous record for highest finite Attack Points ever achieved was done in Zexal, during Yuma’s duel with Don Thousand. He managed to boost Utopia up to 204,000 ATK. I decided that not only did I want to break that record, but I wanted to smash it. Hence we have two monster with over a million Attack Points battling it out in the end. Being the end of the franchise is also the inspiration behind Yu-Gi-Oh’s final line, a quote of Yugi’s final line in the original series. It’s also worth pointing out that the mention of fireworks occurring at the end of the speech is actual an joke. Right before Yugi says his final line, Joey asks in disbelief if this is really how it ends. Kaiba then asks sarcastically, “What were you expecting? Fireworks?” So, I decided to make fireworks happen.

And that concludes the final episode review Yu-Gi-Oh! Millennium. With that said though, don’t think this website is dead. I have some plans for the future, so stay tuned. Also, the Episode Guide, Yu-Gi-Oh! Timeline, and Card Database/Reader’s Companion pages have all reached their final form.

Duel on, always…

Episodes 134-136 Review

Let me start off by telling you how unreal it was writing these episodes. These were some of the very first episodes I planned for the series, and I’ve been constantly revising, adding to, and fine tuning my plans. Those years of planning culminated in these three episodes. One of my biggest disappointments with the original series was that the final battle wasn’t a duel, but, well, a battle. With dueling being the center-point of the franchise, Atem really should have defeated Zorc in a duel, at least that’s what I think. And as I think that, I made it a reality here. Ottiuk’s deck, the Hydra Heads, actually comes from back when I would come up with random deck ideas for fun and have imaginary duels in my mind. The Hydra Head deck was always one of my favorites. As soon as I decided to write Yu-Gi-Oh! Millennium, I knew that the final duel had to have the main villain using them.

Another aspect of the cards used in the duel is the infinite ATK monsters used in the first turn. I got one review about it, and I’m assuming that others realized this as well, but Horackhty and the Knight of Destiny were nothing like their real-world counterparts. This was a case of me taking the liberty of being a writer of an anime-esque series. I worked under the assumption that Horackhty was given its game-winning effect to be a more realistic version of an infinite ATK monster, as it would be awkward to say the least to make an actual monster with infinite ATK. As for the Knight of Destiny, I don’t care if the printed card was called Timaeus the Knight of Destiny, Yugi never once calls it that in the show, so as far as I’m concerned, it’s name is simply the Knight of Destiny.

One final thing to talk about was the goal of these episodes. When I started this series, I had to very different plot points in motion. There was the plot focused on Chaos and the Balance, and their was the Yugoha plot. Sure, there was some interaction between the two plots, but for the most part, they were completely separate. This episode finally firmly established the important link between the two. The other purpose was to give an origin story to Duel Monsters. A simple glance at the original series would tell you that Ancient Egyptian Shadow Games were the origin. The problem is that through out all of the Yu-Gi-Oh series, we see that ancient cultures beyond just Egypt had their own forms of Shadow Games. A closer look suggests that Atlantis was the true origin. After the War of Atlantis, Ironheart’s monster army was scattered across the world, and this could have lead later societies to discover Duel Monsters. However, even closer looks suggest that even this isn’t the whole story. Both GX and Zexal suggest that Duel Monsters is more that just a game played on Earth, it is a fundamental concept across the Universe (or universes in Zexal’s case). Then of course my Yugoha story line outright shows that Duel Monsters exists beyond Earth. So I created an origin story linked to Yugoha. Yugoha created the Monster Spirit World, and countless other cultures over the millennia discovered it, and tapped into its power.

Until next time, duel on!

Episode 129 Review

Hey! Listen!

Yeah, that’s right, this episode was a parody of The Legend of Zelda. Zelda is one of my favorite video game series, and I thought it was a great idea to pay homage to it, and it’s upcoming 30th anniversary in this episode. As child, even before I had actually played any Zelda games, I, as I’m sure countless others had before me, realized how similar the Celtic Guardian looked to Link. It’s uncanny. Not only is he a swordsman wearing all green and a pointed hat, but he also had pointed ears and blond hair. Now, all these years later, I was thinking about that again, I thought about how funny it would be to have a character using a Legend of Zelda themed deck that focused on Celtic Guardian. I decided against that idea, but I quickly realized that an even better opportunity presented itself in the form of my upcoming Capsule Monsters arc. I could actually have Celtic Guardian as a character and set up a Legend of Zelda story. So that’s what I did. It’s worth pointing out though that the story was not entirely drawn from Zelda. I also took inspiration from Dark Ruler Ha Des’ group of cards. Opticlops’ lore states that it is a servant of the Dark Ruler. The imps that were the common enemies came from Order to Smash, a card that shows Ha Des commanding an imp to attack. Berserk Dragon can only be summoned by the spell Deal with the Dark Ruler, which shows Ha Des striking a deal to lend out the power of his dragon. The Winged Minions are known as Ha Des’ Minions in Japan. To continue references to both Ha Des’ story and the Legend of Zelda, I originally planned to have a scene where Ha Des was defeated, but then transformed into Revived King Ha Des, similar to how Ganondorf transforms into Beast King Ganon. Sadly, I realized that Revived King Ha Des was a Synchro, which means it came out after original Yu-Gi-Oh, so it wouldn’t make sense for it to appear in Capsule Monsters. Not only was this episode dedicated to Legend of Zelda, but I made two references to Super Mario Bros, Nintendo’s other iconic series. Brutus’ quote about wanting the princess to be in another castle refered to the original Super Mario Bros. game, where it always seemed like the princess was in another castle. Also, the line at the end of the episode by the Mystical Elf about what Yugi did was an indirect reference to Mario. The M-Warrior was Mario, Princess Pireku was Princess Peach, and The Giant Turtle who Feeds on Flames was Bowser.

The list of references I made to Zelda too large to list, but here are some:

  • The Characters: Celtic Guardian was Link, Key Mace was Navi, Mystical Elf was Zelda, and Ha Des was Ganondorf.
  • The enemies: The imps represented Bokoblins, the common enemy of Zelda, Dark Bat were the random bats, and Skull Servants where ReDeads.
  • The Bosses: Opticlops, Berserk Dragon, and Ha Des all represented bosses/sub-bosses in Zelda games.
  • The Items: Shooting Star Bow – Ceal was Link’s bow and arrows, Pineapple Blast was bombs, Fairy’s Gift caught in a bottle was a fairy in a bottle, and Divine Sword – Phoenix Blade was the Master Sword.
  • The quotes: Many famous quotes from Zelda such as “It’s dangerous to go alone,” were fit into the episode.

Until next time, duel on!

Episode 120 Review

And now the story turns to Ancient Egypt, the focus of the original series. It was a whole new world when compared to Atlantis in more ways then one. When it came to writing about Atlantis, I was just using vague story cues, and essentially writing my own story otherwise. Egypt on the other hand is a much more established place, with a much more established story. The choice to put my story in alternate timeline was not one I arrived at lightly. I really wanted to put my story in the same timeline we see in the original series, the problem is, the first episode of the Dawn of the Duel arc shows the first day that Atem became pharaoh, and the final episode shows him disappearing right before Priest Seto’s eyes. So essentially, if I wanted to write a story about Atem being Pharaoh, it would have to take place in the middle of Dawn of the Duel, and that would never work. So instead, I came up with the idea of using an alternate timeline. I have another reason too, but I’ll leave that as a surprise. The only major thing I added so far to the Egyptian story was my addition of the new High Priests. Mana was an obvious choice to hold the Millennium Ring, since she was Mahad’s student. The other ones were not so easy. I decided that at least one of them needed to be an incarnation of an already known character. I contemplated using Joey, as he is one of the few main characters from the original series to not have an Egyptian version, but decided that I didn’t need to do that. I eventually settled on using Ma’at, as he needed an incarnation besides Thoth. Also, it made perfect sense, as the Millennium Scale is based off of the Scale of Ma’at, the owner of which is Ma’at’s namesake. The name Isfet is actually based off of the opposing concept of Ma’at. While Ma’at is Order, Isfet is Chaos. I felt it was poetic considering recent events. The other High Priests are all named after various Egyptian gods.

Until next time, duel on!

Episode 116 Review

The Battle of Atlantis is an interesting topic, because it was so crucial to the Waking the Dragons arc, and yet there was so little information given on it. Obviously the purpose of this episode was to help give some story to this barely known event. The original show almost seemed to infer that the entire War of Atlantis was simply this one battle. As I’ve already shown, the war has been going on for much longer than that. One thing to note is opening scene when Ironheart summoned the Knights of Atlantis. My scene was almost directly taken from what we see in one of the episodes in the original series. I tweaked it slightly to fit the situation, but that can be attributed to any changes made to the timeline by Otto and Yuni. The point of showing this scene was to help explain one of the biggest contraindications made during the Waking the Dragons arc. If when Ironheart first asked for there help, the Knights of Atlantis were already dragons, then why did Dartz have to seal them away to turn them into dragons later? I made it so that they can be in any form, as they wish, and Dartz merely trapped them in one of those forms.

Until next time, duel on!

Episode 115 Review

This episode was the start of my attempt to retcon and fix the Waking the Dragons arc of the original series. In my opinion, Waking the Dragons was one of the best arcs in all of Yu-Gi-Oh, but it was full of so many flaws, contradictions, and errors. One of the biggest is the Knights/Dragons. First off, why would you seal away a knight as a dragon? Isn’t a dragons more powerful than a knight? Also, if the Legendary Dragons were originally knights, sealed away by Dartz’s curse, then why do we see them as dragons when Ironheart first asks for their help. The purpose of this episode was to explain the origin of the Legendary Dragons/Knights, and hopefully explain a couple of those problems. By making the knights and the dragons separate entities originally, I think managed to allow the story to fit together a little bit better, The next few episodes will continue to this trend.

Until next time, duel on!