Episodes 137-140 Review

Wow…this is really it. Even several days later, I’m still having trouble excepting it.

Anyways, it should be obvious to most that, just as most of the structure of this series was based upon that of the original series, so too was the finale arc. In the original series, the finale of the season took place when Atem battled and defeated Zorc, and then the finale of the series was Yugi’s ceremonial duel with Atem. Similarly, the battle with Ottiuk was meant to be treated as the season finale, and then the extra duel, Yu-Gi-Oh vs. Seto, was meant to be the series finale. As a child, I always remembered thinking that Kaiba got treated a little unfairly in the final season of the show. Ge barely did anything important at all. When he suggested that it should be him who faces Atem in the ceremonial duel, I actually agreed with him. He was Atem’s greatest rival, and it would tie up the series nicely, as the first episode was Yugi/Atem dueling with Kaiba (That being said, I do realize why it had to be Yugi, but still…). When I started thinking of my plot, I realized that not only could I put things right, but it would work out perfectly for the story if I did. This also, at least in my mind, helped make up for the fact that the incarnations of Prince Seto had little to do during the final duel with Ottiuk. This helped remind the reader that they’re important too.

The first episode was designed to be Yuni’s finale, as it was his final appearance in the series. It was all about tying up loose ends. The whole thing with his grandpa is actually something I’ve had planned since the beginning. I’ve always portrayed him as a carefree man that will let Yuni do anything he wants and be happy, as long as he has his recliner chair and a holovision. On the surface, this was an excuse for why Yuni could go off on a moment’s notice to save the world without his grandpa caring, but I figured that it would be more interesting in the end if there actually was a reason for this. As for Ma’at, it has been my intention all along to have him end up as the Lord of Chaos. His entire character arc had been leading up to that one discussion the two of them had.

On to the duel itself. There was a purposeful duality to this duel. Yu-Gi-Oh was using a deck based on Evolution Summoning, the newest way to summon a monster, while Seto was using a Tribute Summon deck, the most classic way (save straight up Normal Summoning) to summon a monster. Yu-Gi-Oh’s deck also served another purpose. It allowed me to showcase my original intentions for Evolution Monsters. My original concept was that Evolution was fairly versatile, and that the Evolution Base could vary, and the effect and/or power of the Evolution Monster would vary depending on the Evolution Base used. In order to best write duels though, I ended up focusing more on Evolution Monsters with set Evolution Base requirements. The Stellamancer deck was a way to better showcase my original idea.

I have always seen Yu-Gi-Oh! Millennium as being a potential grand finale for the Yu-Gi-Oh franchise as a whole. Because of that, I knew it had to end with a bang. The previous record for highest finite Attack Points ever achieved was done in Zexal, during Yuma’s duel with Don Thousand. He managed to boost Utopia up to 204,000 ATK. I decided that not only did I want to break that record, but I wanted to smash it. Hence we have two monster with over a million Attack Points battling it out in the end. Being the end of the franchise is also the inspiration behind Yu-Gi-Oh’s final line, a quote of Yugi’s final line in the original series. It’s also worth pointing out that the mention of fireworks occurring at the end of the speech is actual an joke. Right before Yugi says his final line, Joey asks in disbelief if this is really how it ends. Kaiba then asks sarcastically, “What were you expecting? Fireworks?” So, I decided to make fireworks happen.

And that concludes the final episode review Yu-Gi-Oh! Millennium. With that said though, don’t think this website is dead. I have some plans for the future, so stay tuned. Also, the Episode Guide, Yu-Gi-Oh! Timeline, and Card Database/Reader’s Companion pages have all reached their final form.

Duel on, always…

Episodes 134-136 Review

Let me start off by telling you how unreal it was writing these episodes. These were some of the very first episodes I planned for the series, and I’ve been constantly revising, adding to, and fine tuning my plans. Those years of planning culminated in these three episodes. One of my biggest disappointments with the original series was that the final battle wasn’t a duel, but, well, a battle. With dueling being the center-point of the franchise, Atem really should have defeated Zorc in a duel, at least that’s what I think. And as I think that, I made it a reality here. Ottiuk’s deck, the Hydra Heads, actually comes from back when I would come up with random deck ideas for fun and have imaginary duels in my mind. The Hydra Head deck was always one of my favorites. As soon as I decided to write Yu-Gi-Oh! Millennium, I knew that the final duel had to have the main villain using them.

Another aspect of the cards used in the duel is the infinite ATK monsters used in the first turn. I got one review about it, and I’m assuming that others realized this as well, but Horackhty and the Knight of Destiny were nothing like their real-world counterparts. This was a case of me taking the liberty of being a writer of an anime-esque series. I worked under the assumption that Horackhty was given its game-winning effect to be a more realistic version of an infinite ATK monster, as it would be awkward to say the least to make an actual monster with infinite ATK. As for the Knight of Destiny, I don’t care if the printed card was called Timaeus the Knight of Destiny, Yugi never once calls it that in the show, so as far as I’m concerned, it’s name is simply the Knight of Destiny.

One final thing to talk about was the goal of these episodes. When I started this series, I had to very different plot points in motion. There was the plot focused on Chaos and the Balance, and their was the Yugoha plot. Sure, there was some interaction between the two plots, but for the most part, they were completely separate. This episode finally firmly established the important link between the two. The other purpose was to give an origin story to Duel Monsters. A simple glance at the original series would tell you that Ancient Egyptian Shadow Games were the origin. The problem is that through out all of the Yu-Gi-Oh series, we see that ancient cultures beyond just Egypt had their own forms of Shadow Games. A closer look suggests that Atlantis was the true origin. After the War of Atlantis, Ironheart’s monster army was scattered across the world, and this could have lead later societies to discover Duel Monsters. However, even closer looks suggest that even this isn’t the whole story. Both GX and Zexal suggest that Duel Monsters is more that just a game played on Earth, it is a fundamental concept across the Universe (or universes in Zexal’s case). Then of course my Yugoha story line outright shows that Duel Monsters exists beyond Earth. So I created an origin story linked to Yugoha. Yugoha created the Monster Spirit World, and countless other cultures over the millennia discovered it, and tapped into its power.

Until next time, duel on!

Episode 136: Endgame Part 3

This is it, the ultimate duel has reached its final stage!

Yuni, Yugi, Atem, and Timaeus do all that they can defeat Ottiuk’s Doombringer Hydra, but how can you defeat a monster that gets more powerful the more you attack it? If that’s not bad enough, Ottiuk has one final, dark secret to reveal about Yugoha’s past, one that reveals the truth behind everything.

Until next time, duel on!

Episode 135: Endgame Part 2

It may have taken a while, but Episode 135 is here.

The duel for the fate of the galaxy has begun. Yuni, Yugi, Atem, and Timaeus may have gone all-out to defeat Ottiuk, but Ottiuk is a step ahead of them, summoning the most powerful monster to ever exist. Faced with the invincible might of this monster, all hope seems lost.

Sorry about the delay in posting this episode. It’s the holidays and I’ve been busy. I’d also like to point out this is about the time of Yu-Gi-Oh! Millennium’s fourth anniversary. How appropriate that we’re so close to being done.

Until next time, duel on!

Episode 134: Endgame Part 1

It’s the beginning of the end! Episode 134 is here!

With all eight incarnations of Prince Yu-Gi-Oh and Prince Seto, Yuni, Seto, Yugi, Kaiba, Atem, Priest Seto, Timaeus, and Critias return to Earth at long last, ready to fight and defeat Ottiuk once and for all. But without the power of Another Hope, are they really ready?

Until next time, duel on!

Episode 125 Review

Sorry about the long wait, I just started college, and have been too busy figuring out my life to write episodes. That being said, I hope to get into a more regular schedule from this point on.

Now, down to business. Definitely the most important take-away from this episode is in how it relates to the movie The Pyramid of Light. Throughout the episode I inferred in several different ways that this arc of episodes is actually a prequel to the movie. Most important of those are that if it weren’t for Yuni’s Chaos enchantment, the Dagger of Fate wouldn’t be powerful enough to stop Anubis. Also, the prophecy that tells how defeat Anubis and the Pyramid of Light actually originates in the Pharaoh’s memories of the future. In the science fiction community is known as either a predestination paradox or a temporal causality loop. That means that there is no technical source of an event, instead, two events cause each other in an endless loop through time. These two things pretty much confirm something I’ve been inferring since the beginning of the arc, which is not only does the Pyramid of Light take place in a alternate timeline, but it takes place in the timeline created when Yuni and his friends went back in time to recruit Atem and Priest Seto.

Speaking of Priest Seto, the other major point of this episode was to wrap up his story with Aknadin, his father. I had always felt like the way Aknadin was dealt with in Dawn of the Duel was a little poor. He defeated and sent to the Shadow Realm. There was no real closure between him and Priest Seto. It wasn’t like he necessarily deserved it, but it could have made for a better story. So, I used that here (and I’m sure just about anyone can guess what movie inspired that final scene between Priest Seto and Aknadin).

Until next time, duel on!

Episode 125: Events Predetermined

Episode 125, the finale of the Millennium Era Arc is here.

The time for the final battle with Anubis is at hand. Atem, Yuni, and friends have forged the powerful Dagger of Fate and are ready for their rematch. Will this be enough, or will the Lord of the Dead send them to the Realm of the Dead?

Until next time, duel on!